HeraTech

December 22, 2009

Agile Tenet #3 – Deliver Frequently

Filed under: Uncategorized — heratech @ 8:09 am
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Number three Third in a series of posts examining the Twelve Principles of Agile Software and how each of these tenets can (or can’t) be applied or adapted to technical writing.

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Deliver working software frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, with a preference to the shorter timescale.

When I was working in a Waterfall development environment my writing process was long and drawn out, similar to writing a novel. I once worked a solid 18 months on a single release. The User’s Guide was almost completely revised, and weighed in at 450 pages by the time I was done. For that particular release I did nothing for three solid months but read through the hundreds of pages of specifications for the release, taking notes along the way of new applications being added to our application suite and new features. Then I struggled with my outline for several weeks, trying to figure out a structure that would accommodate the new material. I was writing notes and draft topics the whole time, but the new release had so many different applications, that it was hard to find a structure that would fit the wide range of new features. Once I settled on a structure, I spent almost a year playing with the software builds, exploring the new features, interviewing a dozen different product managers, writing and revising before the software and doc was actually released.

In Write to Learn Donald Murray describes techniques used by all writers (Collect, Focus, Order, Draft, and Clarify), and urges his students to adapt them to their needs. And that list describes my writing process pretty well. My technical writing textbook, How to Communicate Technical Information, breaks the writing process down to just Planning, Writing, and Revising. However you define your writing process, in an Agile environment it is severely compressed.

I’ve heard TWs estimate that they only spend between 25% to 40% of their time actually writing, with the rest of their time taken up with e-mail, meetings, planning, research, and other non-writing tasks. When you’re writing documentation in an Agile environment, your process is no longer the long slow march towards a major release. In an Agile environment, you’ve got to be much more efficient. You have much less time to think about what you’re going to write, because if you are going to deliver content by the end of the Sprint, you need to stay focused on tasks that support the writing.

I’ve already written about how I use modular writing, and some of the techniques I use for being ready to publish at all times. Making the switch from the long cycles of Waterfall to shorter Agile Sprints has not been as big a shift for me as it might be for writers who were not used to delivering information in small chunks. But even so, I’ve had to learn to let go of my own expectations for the documentation. There has always been a gap between the documentation that I want to deliver and the documentation that I can deliver in a given timeframe. With a shorter timeframe, that gap widens considerably. (Thank goodness tenet #9 is Attention to Excellence!)

It seems to me that one of the tricks of being an Agile technical writer is to be less like the novelist and more like a journalist on deadline, trying to scoop the competition with a big story. Journalists are continuously writing because they have to deliver content, be it a daily newspaper, news weekly, or monthly magazine. But unlike a journalist, the Agile TW can always go back and revise what they’ve written in a later iteration.

Deliver documentation frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, with a preference to the shorter timescale and delivery of smaller chunks of information.

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1 Comment »

  1. […] Agile Tenet #3 – Deliver Frequently and Agile Tenet #4 – Work Together Daily (Julie Stickler) […]

    Pingback by Dew Drop – December 23, 2009 | Alvin Ashcraft's Morning Dew — December 23, 2009 @ 9:37 am | Reply


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