HeraTech

December 23, 2009

Agile Tenet #4 – Work Together Daily

Filed under: Uncategorized — heratech @ 7:39 am
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Four hands Fourth in a series of posts examining the Twelve Principles of Agile Software and how each of these tenets can (or can’t) be applied or adapted to technical writing.

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Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project.

When I was studying for my technical writing certificate, one of the things that my writing instructor emphasized was to know your audience. I want as much information as possible about my customers and their tasks so that I can write documentation that meets their needs. At my first technical writing job that was a bit of a challenge. The company made a highly configurable product for managing assets and work orders that was marketed to a wide variety of different industries. Our customers fell into four main categories:

  • Manufacturing and utilities production
  • Hotels, universities, and other facilities
  • Buses, trains, aircraft, and other fleet vehicles
  • Information technology (IT) assets
  • As you can imagine, this created a bit of a challenge for the writing team. Our customers could be virtually anyone.

    In the years that I was employed there I worked hard to gather information about our customers. The company sponsored an annual User Group conference that was well attended. Unfortunately, when they were picking the employees who would attend, the Powers That Be favored product managers, support, and quality assurance engineers, and not technical writers. One year we managed to send both doc managers, who conducted a customer survey and hosted a documentation discussion that they taped and played for the team at one of our department meetings.

    Since I couldn’t attend the user group, I decided to find other avenues for face-to-face contact with our customers. I started working closely with our training department. I made friends with some of our trainers and course developers over lunches in the company cafeteria. As a result, they started inviting me to sit in on beta training for new courses, since I could provide feedback to the course developers. I also made an effort to attend our customer training courses at least once or twice a year. I always paid close attention to the scenarios that the trainers were using to present our product, and listened to the questions that our customers asked. And our customers often asked a lot of detailed questions, trying to squeeze some free consulting out of our trainers.

    In my final year at that company I worked on a specialized part of the product, and my manager was finally able to get me on the list for our User Group conference. I spent four days on the floor, demonstrating the product in our Demo area and answering customer questions about new features. I also was able to attend a few of the customer presentations, and was fascinated by the different and creative ways that our customers were using the product. As a result of meeting the moderator at the conference, I was also able to join the heavily moderated, customers-only Yahoo group for our product, which gave me even more insight into our customers.

    I left that job for another one, working for a smaller company whose product was in the same space. I had much more customer contact at my second TW job, attending a User Group conference in my third week on the job. At that job I was a Lone Writer, and as a result I wore many more hats. During the year and a half that I worked for that company, I attended three different User Groups, assisted one of our consultants with an implementation at a customer site, and taught one session of user training.

    At my current job I’m back to having limited information about our customers, and the product owner for our teams is the VP of Engineering. I’m back to brainstorming ways to learn about our customers. I’ve been getting to know our support team. And we just hired a trainer, someone who I know from a previous job and with whom I already have a good working relationship.

    Just as I was getting ready to write this post, one of Mike Cottmeyer’s Interesting Links posts let me to a post about how Agile isn’t designed to meet the needs of customers. This makes me wonder, despite the stated goal of involving customers in the development process, how much actual customer contact I can expect in an Agile environment?

    I think we should make a slight revision to the wording of this tenet, from “developers” to “teams” so that it includes technical writers, testers and other team members.

    Business people and teams must work together daily throughout the project.

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    1 Comment »

    1. […] Tenet #3 – Deliver Frequently and Agile Tenet #4 – Work Together Daily (Julie […]

      Pingback by Dew Drop – December 23, 2009 | Alvin Ashcraft's Morning Dew — December 23, 2009 @ 9:38 am | Reply


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