HeraTech

December 28, 2009

Agile Tenet #6– Face-to-face Communication

Filed under: Uncategorized — heratech @ 8:22 am
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Six elephants Sixth in a series of posts examining the Twelve Principles of Agile Software and how each of these tenets can (or can’t) be applied or adapted to technical writing.

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The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation.

There have been many times when I’ve sent an e-mail to a Subject Matter Expert and asked, “Does it work like this, or like that?” And have received back a terse answer of “Yes.” Argh! Which usually leads to me tracking down the SME in his lair and asking, in person, does that answer mean “Yes it works like this” or “Yes it works like that.”

The short trek to Developer Land is often worth the effort, as most of the developers I know would rather talk about what they’re doing than write about it. (Or occasionally draw about it, my VP loves to scribble on his white board.) So I get much more information out of a conversation that I would from an e-mail or a specification. The conversations often lead to me gaining information that I wouldn’t have thought to ask about in the first place. And I also get the opportunity to ask questions, instantly clarifying points that I don’t understand.

Despite how useful face-to-face communication can be, it is not the first thing that I rely on when I’m doing research. I am a reader, and a fast reader at that. So I try to do my homework before I go to a product manager or developer with questions. If I can answer a question by myself, I don’t want to bother someone else. And I’ve found that doing as much advance research as I can, be that reading or experimenting with the software, helps me to focus my questions, and results in better answers. It saves time for both me and the person I’m interviewing.

Tenet 6 is one that has a huge impact on how technical writers do their work. With an emphasis on more face-to-face communication and less written communication, the writer has reduced access to specifications or even e-mail threads when they’re doing their research. If the writer is in the same physical location as the development team and the quality assurance team, that lack of project documentation can be made up with more face-to-face communication. But these days, off-shoring means that a lot of us don’t even work on the same continent as some of our team members. My first tech writing job had team members in Canada, Brazil, and India. My second had development in New Zealand and quality assurance in India. My current position has developers and QA in both India and China. I’m sure that there are those that would say that if team members aren’t all co-located that means we’re “not doing Agile.” But I suspect that most companies are in a similar position, with team members scattered all over the globe.

Which means the team needs to develop new skills for building and maintaining teams. At my previous job I used Skype to chat with my New Zealand developers on a regular basis. My current job has also experimented with using Skype and instant messaging with team members in China to bring them into the Scrum meetings one or two days a week. We have an internal Wiki, and there is a team page with everyone’s picture, and all of our contact information (e-mail, phone numbers, Skype and instant messaging IDs). Being able to put a face to a name helps you feel more connected to someone who you’ve never met.

I’m still making the transition from my old work habits to more Agile ones. As I work through the backlog of doc bugs and undocumented legacy features and start working on the new features, I know that my research will be quite a bit less reading and a lot more interviewing. I’ll be back to the journalism model where the writer is interviewing the SME. I’ll need to be proactive and get out of my office and talk to my team more than I’m used to. I’m pretty sure that I’m going to be handicapped by my six month absence from Scrum. I’ve missed a lot of design discussions, and without project documentation it’s going to be hard to catch up on what I’ve missed. It’s going to be a challenge. But this is one of the few areas where I’ve heard positive things from other Agile technical writers, so I know it is a challenge I can meet.

The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation. It is essential that the technical writer be considered a full team member and be included in these conversations.

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2 Comments »

  1. […] Agile Tenet #6– Face-to-face Communication (Julie Stickler) […]

    Pingback by Dew Drop – December 28, 2009 | Alvin Ashcraft's Morning Dew — December 28, 2009 @ 9:26 am | Reply

  2. […] Agile Tenet #6– Face-to-face Communication (Julie Stickler) […]

    Pingback by Dew Drop – December 29, 2009 | Alvin Ashcraft's Morning Dew — December 29, 2009 @ 8:02 am | Reply


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