HeraTech

January 6, 2010

Agile Tenet #8 – Sustainable Pace

Filed under: Uncategorized — heratech @ 11:09 pm
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Magic 8 Ball Eighth in a series of posts examining the Twelve Principles of Agile Software and how each of these tenets can (or can’t) be applied or adapted to technical writing.

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Agile processes promote sustainable development. The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant pace indefinitely. [emphasis mine]

Ah, a constant pace. Technical writers aren’t used to that. At least not in a Waterfall development environment. Waterfall technical writers are used to a significant amount of slack time at the beginning of the production cycle, then a stretch of regular work while coding continues, followed by a frantic scramble, often involving overtime, at the end of the production cycle.

One of the big disadvantages I can see to adopting Agile Sprints is that TWs lose the slack time at the beginning of the development cycle. I don’t know a single writer that has enough time to accomplish everything that they’re expected to do. Writers often use that beginning-of-the-cycle down time to catch up on projects that are important but not urgent, like researching writing tools, evaluating documentation processes, designing templates or style sheets, developing style guides, or just plain catching up on everything they didn’t finish in the rush to release. And heaven forbid you need to convert a large legacy documentation set to either a new tool or a new process. How on earth do Agile writers find time for big projects like adopting DITA? The short Sprint timeline makes taking time away from writing for things like conferences, training, and a well-earned vacation a little harder to plan.

Or maybe I’m still making the mental adjustment from being a member of a documentation team to being a sole writer. Even though it’s been a few years, it still feels weird to realize that I am the entire team now. And that if something needs to be done, there isn’t anyone but me make sure that happens.

One of the clear benefits I can see to adopting Agile Sprints is they eliminate that last-minute documentation rush at the end of the release cycle. Or if the scramble isn’t completely eliminated, at least the stress is spread around a bit more evenly so it doesn’t feel so bad. I can really embrace the idea of working at a steady pace.

But I keep bumping up against my fears about who gets to define what a “steady pace” is and whether or not my own personal, idiosyncratic writing style can be made to fit into the Agile mode. What about when I have writer’s block? (Yes, even technical writers get writer’s block.) There are days when the words just don’t flow. This is one of the reasons why I usually have a couple of side projects going at any time. If I can’t get my writing mojo to work, I can switch over and do some training, work on my glossary of product terminology, do some indexing, or spend time trawling the network/wiki for other useful documents that no one thought to forward to the writer. But those side projects, while productive, are not usually the sort of things that would fit neatly into a user story. Thus my anxiety about keeping up a steady pace of work.

Thinking and writing about this tenet reveals my anxiety that Agile is about forcing me to become more productive, ever increasingly more productive. I’m not a slacker by any means. At least not when I compared my production to the other writers when I worked in a doc group. And when I compare my page count from one year’s work to my estimates for what I should have been able to produce (based on the Dependency Calculator), I’m cruising right along. So why do I always feel like business is never happy with a productive employee and always wants more work (and for less pay)? And that no matter how hard I work, it will never be good enough?

Or maybe I’m just feeling uncomfortable about admitting to non-technical writers that the majority of my time is not spent writing, but on other activities? There is this misconception that all writers do is write. Judging from the number of writers blogs I read (both literary and technical writers) most writers spend less than half their time actually writing. Most non-writers don’t understand that all that non-writing contributes to the writing. And that “doing research” is not code for “farting around on the internet.” At least, not usually.

Or maybe I’m dealing with my own attempts at sustaining a constant pace of posting to this blog. And I’m finding that despite my huge list of ideas for possible posts, some weeks it is easier to generate three posts and other weeks it is a bit of a struggle. Of course, the only person requiring me to post three times a week is me. And perhaps the whole point of this post was to get me to realize that the person who has the highest expectations for my work is not my employer, but me. And that I need to give myself permission to find my own sustainable pace.

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2 Comments »

  1. […] Agile Tenet #8 – Sustainable Pace (Julie Stickler) […]

    Pingback by Dew Drop – January 7, 2010 | Alvin Ashcraft's Morning Dew — January 7, 2010 @ 8:06 am | Reply

  2. Agile doesn’t necessarily translate to less scramble before releases or the end of iterations (sprints) for me. Think release notes. But I agree that with Agile, tech writers begin work earlier because the developers are supposed to be writing releasable code every iteration.

    What has helped me is when the project management agrees to my deliverables being done from release to release rather than from iteration to iteration. That way, since we usually have two or three iterations between releases, I have some extra time and can be flexible in making sure I have everything in place from each iteration before the release happens.

    Comment by Ben — February 3, 2010 @ 3:06 pm | Reply


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