HeraTech

November 21, 2009

Approaching Agile

Filed under: Uncategorized — heratech @ 8:31 am
Tags: , , , , , , ,
Little girl peeking through fence

Sneaking up on it

I think I was destined to become an Agile technical writer.  In the summer of 2008 I was working for a small software company that produced two different products.  After finishing up a stretch of concentrating on the documentation for product A, I checked in with the product B developers in New Zealand.  I discovered that they’d decided to adopt Agile development without telling me. 

I responded the way I always do when faced with a new idea.  I did some research.

I started out by checked the Techwr-l archives for threads that mentioned Agile.  I’ve been a member of Techwr-l since 2005, and since I use G-mail to manage my list subscriptions, it was fairly easy to find the few discussions of Agile from the past couple of years.  Unfortunately, what little I found didn’t sound too encouraging from a tech writer’s point of view.

I also looked through my collection of back issues of the Intercom, the journal of the Society for Technical Communications.  I found two articles about Agile documentation:

  • Adapting to SCRUM: Challenges and Strategies (July/August 2007)
  • Extreme Documentation (February 2003)

Wikipedia and Google turned up plenty of articles, and also led me to the Agile Manifesto and Scott Ambler’s Web Site.   I had to do quite a bit of reading before I finally realized that when Agile proponents were writing things like “Documentation should be just barely good enough.” and “The benefit of having documentation must be greater than the cost of creating and maintaining it.” They were talking about project documentation (design documents, functional specs, etc), not product documentation like User Guides and Help. And with the exception of the STC articles, none of the resources I was reading were talking about what a technical writer would produce, or how they fit into Agile (other than being part of the Scrum team).

I had just started reading Agile Software Development with Scrum when a friend forwarded a job opening to me.  The job description sounded like a very good fit with my skills and interests.  The company was looking for someone with experience working in an Agile software development environment.

By this point I’d learned enough about Agile to know that the way we were implementing it at my company (developers in two different cities, the tech writer and project manager on a completely different continent) was not going to be conducive to my success as an Agile Technical Writer.   And I was intrigued by Agile. I now knew enough to be able to “talk the talk” during my interviews.  During my interview I quizzed the VP of Engineering.  They were still using the Waterfall Model, but were planning to switch to Agile development at the beginning of 2009.  

I liked the idea of getting in at the beginning and being able to shape the way the technical writer fit into the Agile team.   They made me an offer, I accepted, and I started work there in October 2008.

Fast forward to May 2009 and the end of Sprint 4.  The last day of the sprint our company had a layoff, and I was one of the casualties.  Six weeks later they called me back to work part time (two days a week).  So while I’m still working in an Agile environment, I’m no longer embedded with the team working to document the current sprint.  Hopefully that will change as the economy starts to recover.

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